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6.0 Degree Requirements: Coursework

The university confers graduate degrees upon candidates who meet the requirements designated by the appropriate graduate committees, the Graduate Council, and the faculty of the university. Credit toward a graduate degree is recognized only for those courses for which the student is registered or those credits that are transferred with the Department's approval.

6.1 Requirements for All Degrees

6.1.1 Prerequisites

As a prerequisite to acceptance in the graduate program, students normally have completed all courses required for the award of the degree of B.S. in Metallurgical Engineering as detailed in The University of Utah General Catalog, or equivalent courses at other universities.

In cases where the student has not completed these courses, s/he includes in her/his course of study for a higher degree those courses required to satisfy the requirement. Exceptions must be approved by the Supervisory Committee. Courses completed for undergraduate credit do not normally qualify for graduate credit.

In order to plan your coursework, ask the Graduate Advisor how many semesters of tuition benefit you may be eligible for. If you have received a Masters degree, consult with your faculty advisor and the department Director of Graduate Studies whether any Masters courses may be used to waive required Ph.D. coursework.

6.1.2 Graduate-Level Courses

All courses numbered 6000 or above are considered graduate-level courses. No 5000–level or lower courses are accepted for graduate credit without the prior written approval of the student's Supervisory Committee and the Director of Graduate Studies.

See The University of Utah General Catalog for a list of graduate courses.

 

6.1.3 Core Courses for M.S. and Ph.D. Programs

A series of core courses have been established for the graduate program. These courses are highly recommended and are considered basic for each discipline. See your graduate advisor for more information.

Core Courses for All Graduate Students:

MINERAL PROCESSING

MET E 6670 Mineral Processing I

MET E 6750 Rate Processes

HYDROMETALLURGY

MET E 6670 Mineral Processing I

MET E 6700 Hydrometallurgy

MET E 6750 Rate Processes

PYROMETALLURGY

MET E 6750 Rate Processes

MET E 6710 High-Temperature Chemical Processing

PHYSICAL METALLURGY

MET E 6260 Physical Metallurgy I

MET E 6450 Mechanical Metallurgy

MET E 6780 Metals Processing

 

Additional Core Courses for Ph.D. Students

MINERAL PROCESSING

MET E 6730 Flotation Chemistry

MET E 6680 Mineral Processing II

HYDROMETALLURGY

MET E 6600 Corrosion Fundamentals and Minimization

MET E 6710 High-Temperature Chemical Processing

PYROMETALLURGY

MET E 6700 Hydrometallurgy

CHEM E 6553 Chemical Reaction Engineering

MET E 6750 Rate Processes

PHYSICAL METALLURGY

MET E 6300 Alloy and Material Design

MET E 7270 Physical Metallurgy II

MET E 6240 Principles and Practice of Transmission Electron Microscopy

6.1.4 Course Fees

All students registered for laboratory courses in the department are assessed a fee to offset the cost of replacing reagents, glassware and other expendable materials used or damaged during the semester. Course fees may also assessed for courses with field trips.

6.1.5 Graduate Seminar Attendance

All graduate students are required to attend Graduate Seminar (MET E 7800) every semester that they are at the university. Registration for Graduate Seminar is required Fall and Spring semesters each academic year, for two years for an M.S. degree and for three years for a Ph.D. degree. No more than two credits (four half credits) for graduate seminar may be applied towards an M.S. degree. No more than three credits (six half credits) may be applied towards a Ph.D. degree.

If the student completes all work on the degree in less than two years for an M.S. or three for a Ph.D., the requirement is 75% attendance during this shorter time.

As proof of attendance, the student signs the roll at each seminar. If a student attends at least 75% of seminars during each semester, s/he receives credit for the course.

If you will be unable to attend due to conflicts with other courses, employment, etc., discuss this with the Graduate Advisor beforehand. Extra credit may be available for conference attendance.

Each student is required to present a seminar at least once. See page 20.

6.1.6 Maximum Registration

No candidate for a graduate degree may register for more than sixteen credit hours in any one semester. This includes evening resident credit and daytime classes. Teaching fellows and others employed approximately halftime are limited to a maximum registration of twelve credit hours.

6.1.7 Transfer Credit

Graduate credit may be transferred from other institutions and applied toward fulfillment of graduate degree requirements.

Up to six hours of transfer credit from courses may be applied toward fulfillment of master's degree requirements. For the Ph.D., transfer credits may be applied without limit as long as the registration requirements are met, subject to approval by the Director of Graduate Studies. Course credits used for a Master's degree may be used to fulfill the course credit requirement for the Ph.D. degree.

Transfer credit must be

  • a) of high grade,
  • b) recommended by the student's Supervisory Committee,
  • c) taken within four years if applied to the M.S., and
  • d) not counted toward and needed to complete any previous degree.

6.1.8 Nonmatriculated or Correspondence Work

A student may count no more than six credit hours of nonmatriculated work toward a graduate degree, unless the student's registration for additional credit is specifically approved in advance by the Supervisory Committee Chair. Courses taken by correspondence or home study are not eligible for graduate credit.

6.2 Master of Science

6.2.1 General Coursework and Study Requirements for the M.S.

Candidates for the Master of Science degree must earn a minimum of thirty semester hours in graduate courses and thesis research. A minimum of twenty semester hours must be in course work in metallurgical engineering or related technical subjects, with the balance (ten semester hours) in thesis research. The student is required to maintain at least a "B" grade point average. Faculty Consultation (MET E 6980) does not count toward fulfillment of degree requirements.

6.2.2 Residency

At least twenty-four credit hours must be in resident study at the university.

6.2.3 Independent Study

Time spent on research preparation, bibliographic work, acquiring new mathematical or computer skills, or developing new instrumentation are to be counted toward fulfilling an Independent Study (MET E 7920) class requirement. An M.S. student may register for up to three Independent Study hours per semester and may take up to six credit hours of Independent Study classes total. The instructor will typically be the student's research supervisor but may in special cases be another faculty member. A student needs approval from her/his research supervisor or an individual instructor before registering for Independent Study. Each faculty member's Independent Study is identified by a section number in the course catalog.

6.2.4 Program of Study

Once the student has completed his/her coursework, but at least one semester before graduation, the student obtains approval of her/his coursework from the committee. The student provides the necessary information, in writing, on approved coursework to the department Graduate Advisor to prepare the online "Program of Study" form. The Program of Study must also be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. Subsequent changes must be approved by the student's Committee and a new Program of Study submitted.

6.2.5 Time Limits

All work offered for the Master's Degree must be completed within four consecutive calendar years from matriculation. This includes transfer credits. The department may modify or waive this requirement in meritorious cases on recommendation from the student's Supervisory Committee.

6.3 Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The Ph.D. degree represents high scholarly achievement demonstrated by independent research and is not awarded simply for the fulfillment of resident or credit requirements.

6.3.1 General Coursework and Study Requirements for the Ph.D.

The student must do three or more years of approved graduate study, including one year (that is, two consecutive semesters) in full-time continuous residence at the University of Utah.

A minimum of sixty-seven semester hours of credit is required for the degree, of which thirty-three credit hours are course credits in metallurgical engineering or related technical subjects, and thirty-four are dissertation research credits. Faculty Consultation (MET E 7980) does not count toward fulfillment of degree requirements.

Courses taken for a master's degree may be used to waive parts of the total credit hours required for the doctoral degree.

The student is strongly encouraged to take the Ph.D. core courses. Also, a student is encouraged to take core courses from areas other than her/his own main area. For instance, mineral processing students may take physical metallurgy and extractive metallurgy classes and vice versa.

Ph.D. course requirements make no distinction between allied and major field. Depending on the student's research needs and interests, s/he may take classes in other departments, or s/he may take all her/his classes within the Department of Metallurgical Engineering.

6.3.2 Independent Study

Time spent on research preparation, bibliographic work, acquiring new mathematical or computer skills, or developing new instrumentation are to be counted toward fulfilling an Independent Study (MET E 7920) class requirement. A Ph.D. student may register for up to a limit of five credit hours of Independent Study per semester and may take up to sixteen hours total. The instructor will typically by the student's research supervisor but may in special cases be another faculty member. A student needs approval from her/his research supervisor or an individual instructor before registering for Independent Study. Each faculty member's Independent Study is identified by a section number in the course catalog.

6.3.3 Residency

At least one year (that is, two consecutive semesters) of the doctoral program must be in full-time academic work at the university. For the purpose of fulfilling the residency requirement, a full load is nine hours. When a student proceeds directly from a master's degree to a Ph.D. degree with no break in the Program of Study (except for authorized leaves of absence), the residency requirement may be fulfilled at any time during the course of study.

6.3.4 Admission to Candidacy for the Ph.D. Program — Qualifying Examination

All students desiring to study for the Ph.D. degree must take a Qualifying Examination on the field of metallurgical engineering. The Qualifying Examination is based on undergraduate work and is an oral exam followed if necessary by a written exam. Upon passage, the Graduate Advisor enters the date of the examination in the student's online record. If the examining committee deems it necessary, the committee may also require the candidate to take and pass courses in certain areas.

The Qualifying Examination is given in April of each year. Students with a prior degree in metallurgical engineering who start the Ph.D. program in Summer Term or Fall Semester should take the Qualifying Examination the following April. Students arriving Spring Semester take the Qualifying Examination in April of the following year. A student without a lower degree in metallurgical engineering who desires to obtain a Ph.D. in this discipline may take the exam the second April s/he is on campus, as s/he has to take undergraduate courses to achieve competency in this field.

A departmental Qualifying Examination Committee considers the student's scholastic record (GPA, master's thesis, performance in coursework after the master's degree, etc.), together with performance in the exam, in order to reach a decision on whether or not to admit him/her to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree.

Students are not normally allowed to take the Qualifying Examination a second time. If a student is not granted admission to the Ph.D. program and s/he feels that the decision should be reconsidered, s/he may submit a written petition to the faculty containing all pertinent information which could affect the decision. The quality of the petition is reviewed by the faculty, and a final decision rendered.

The student must pass the Research Proposal Examination within twelve months after the Qualifying Examination.

6.3.5 Program of Study

It is suggested that the student find a faculty advisor as soon as possible, because the burden of convincing the Supervisory Committee of the course hours falls upon the student otherwise. Each semester the student must get the faculty advisor's approval of the classes for which s/he is planning to register. Finally, the Supervisory Committee must also approve the student's coursework.

The student provides the necessary information, in writing, to the Graduate Advisor to enter the Program of Study in the online record. Subsequent changes must be approved by the Supervisory Committee and a new Program of Study submitted.

6.3.6 Time Limits

All work offered for the PhD Degree must be completed within seven consecutive calendar years from matriculation. The department may modify or waive this requirement in meritorious cases on recommendation from the student's Supervisory Committee.

6.4 Master of Engineering (M.E.)

This degree is not based solely on the accumulation of a given number of hours of course work but should be built around providing specialized training for the student. All requirements for the M.S. degree with the exception of the thesis apply to the M.E. degree. In place of a thesis defense the candidate must take a comprehensive oral and/or written examination conducted by his/her Supervisory Committee.

6.4.1 Admission to Candidacy

The qualifications for admission to the Master of Engineering Program are the same as those of the Graduate School.

Once the student has completed his/her coursework, but at least one semester before graduation, the student obtains approval from the committee of her/his coursework. The student requests the Graduate Advisor to enter the Program of Study in the online record and provides the necessary information, in writing, on coursework. Subsequent changes must be approved by the student's Committee and a new Program of Study submitted.

6.4.2 Course Requirements

Information of the specific requirements for the degree may be obtained from the department or The University of Utah General Catalog.

The Master of Engineering degree requires completion of a minimum of thirty credit hours of graduate, professionally oriented course work. These hours may include both graduate courses and approved undergraduate courses. Twenty credit hours are in the major area and include special topics courses of four to six credit hours. Special topics are individual work in some aspect of engineering design and must result in a final report.

Thesis research hours do not apply towards the total hours required. Thus the actual coursework requirements are greater than for an M.S. Be aware of this particularly if changing status from an M.S. to an M.E.

The Program of Study for each Master of Engineering degree candidate is carefully planned by the student and her/his Supervisory Committee of three faculty members, who may request the assistance of additional faculty members.

6.4.4 Time Limits

All work offered for the Master of Engineering Degree must be completed within four consecutive calendar years unless an extension is granted by the dean of the college.

6.4.5 Final Report and Examination

In place of the Master's Thesis the student must write a paper involving an aspect of engineering design which represents an equivalent effort of four to six semester credit hours. The paper may include process design, field studies or other appropriate topics. The candidate must take a comprehensive oral and/or written examination conducted by his/her Supervisory Committee.

The candidate must be regularly enrolled for three or more credit hours at the university during the semester or term in which the final report is submitted and the examination conducted.

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Last Updated: 9/13/17